Seed Kit:


1.BRINJAL

     The brinjal (eggplant or baingan or aubergine) is called the King of Vegetables by some cultures. It is one of the most versatile vegetables around, loved by many people across the world.Different varieties are available everywhere and each variety is unique in its own way, with a distinctive flavor and many essential minerals.

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2. CHILLI ⇓

    The chili pepper (also chile pepper or chilli pepper, from Nahuatlchilli) is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. The term in British English and in Australia, New Zealand, India, Malaysia and other Asian countries is just chilli without "pepper".

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3. TOMATO ⇓

    Tomatoes are an incredibly versatile food. They are often considered as a vegetable, though ideally they are a citrus fruit. They are a rich source of Vitamin C and help in increasing your immunity. Not just this, tomatoes also provide several other vitamins, magnesium, phosphorus and copper, all of which are necessary for good health. The best part is that they can be eaten either raw, in salads, sandwiches or in vegetables.

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4. BHENDI ⇓

    Okra is a tropical plant that is grown as an annual vegetable. The seed pods are especially useful for thickening stews because of their gummy mucilage. Okra plants are extremely drought and heat resistant and okra is a popular vegetable in many countries with difficult growing conditions.

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5. RADISH ⇓

    There are some radishes that are grown for their seeds; oilseed radishes are grown, as the name implies, for oil production. Radish can sprout from seed to small plant in as little as 3 days. Also known as spring radishes, summer radishes, winter radishes, Oriental radishes, Daikon, Japanese radishes, Chinese radishes, Raphanussativus

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6. LIMA BEANS / CLUSTER BEANS ⇓

    The Guar or cluster bean (Cyamopsistetragonoloba) is an annual legume and the source of guar gum. It is also known as Gavar, Guwar or Guvar bean. This legume is a very valuable plant within a crop rotation cycle, as it lives in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. In fact, agriculturists in semi-arid regions of Rajasthan follow crop-rotation and use Guar as a source to replenish the soil with essential fertilizers and nitrogen fixation, before the next crop.

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7. BOTTLE GOURD ⇓

    The bottlegourd belongs to the cucumber family and originated in Africa, and is now available in most parts of the world. Also known as calabash, cucuzza, sorakaya, lauki, doodhi, and ghiya in various languages, this vegetable comes in different shapes, the most common being the bottle-shaped (hence the name) and round. The sizes vary from six inches in length to more than six feet.

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8. SPONGE GOURD ⇓

    Growing luffa plants requires a certain amount of patience. It's not a typical garden plant. It grows for a longer time than most gourds. Sometimes the seeds can be slow to germinate. Luffa is a hot weather plant and growth slows in cool weather. The flowers appear over an extended period of time blooming sequentially as the vine progresses. The vines can grow 30 feet(10m) long over the course of a growing season. Once the fruits form it may take a long time to fully develop fiber and dry for harvest. Then the work of picking, peeling, and cleaning happens late in the year. Luffa requires about 150 to 200 or more warm frost free days, depending on the location and variety grown.

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9. SNAKE GOURD ⇓

    Snake gourd is a climbing herb with tendrils divided into three parts. It has white male and female flowers and cylindrical, slender, tapering fruits with waxy surface. Its fruits are orange in colour when ripe, and pulpy red at maturity. An analysis of Snake gourd shows it to consist of substantial amount of protein, fat, fibre and carbohydrates

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10. RIDGE GOURD ⇓

    Ridge gourd scientifically known as Luffa acutangula and also known as turiya or turai or beerakai or dodka in different languages in India is another variety of gourd and a versatile vegetable which adds a facet to the vegetarian cuisine. This is also known as Chinese Okra or Sponge gourd.

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11. BITTER GOURD ⇓

    Bitter gourd plant is a fast growing creeper and is from the family of vines. It is also known as nutritious gourd and bitter melon. Bitter gourd plants vary shape, size and colour but the medicinal uses make bitter melon more important and distinct than other medicinal plant

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12. GREEN AMARAMNTH ⇓

    Amaranth has been cultivated as a grain for 8,000 years. The yield of grain amaranth is comparable to rice or maize. It was a staple food of the Aztecs, and was used as an integral part of Aztec religious ceremonies. The grain is popped and mixed with honey. In North India, it is called "rajgira". The popped grain is mixed with melted jaggery in proper proportion to make iron and energy rich "laddus" a popular food provided at the Mid-day Meal Program in municipal schools.

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13. CORIANDER ⇓

    Bitter gourd plant is a fast growing creeper and is from the family of vines. It is also known as nutritious gourd and bitter melon. Bitter gourd plants vary shape, size and colour but the medicinal uses make bitter melon more important and distinct than other medicinal plant

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14. FENUGREEK⇓

    Fenugreek, Latin name Trigonellafoenum-graecum, is an annual herb native to South Europe and Asia. The plant grows quickly to 2 feet tall and fixes nitrogen into the soil. White or yellow flowers appear in the early summer and develop yellow-brown seed pods in the fall. This legume plant is used for food, seasoning, condiments, medicine, dye and livestock forage. The plant and seed give off a maple aroma and taste. This herb is tender and does not survive freezing weather, so the seeds are cultivated during the spring after the last frost occurs.

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15. SPINACH ⇓

     Spinach is a cool-weather vegetable related to beets and Swiss chard. A fast-growing plant, it yields many leaves in a short time in the mild weather of spring and fall. The trick lies in making spinach last as long as possible, especially in the spring, when lengthening days shorten its life. Although it prefers full sun, spinach will still produce a respectable harvest in partial shade.

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16. RED AMARANTH⇓

    Amaranth has been cultivated as a grain for 8,000 years. The yield of grain amaranth is comparable to rice or maize. It was a staple food of the Aztecs, and was used as an integral part of Aztec religious ceremonies. The grain is popped and mixed with honey. In North India, it is called "rajgira". The popped grain is mixed with melted jaggery in proper proportion to make iron and energy rich "laddus" a popular food provided at the Mid-day Meal Program in municipal schools.

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17. BROCCOLI GREEN ⇓

    This cool-season crop grows best when daytime temperatures are in the 60s F. Grow in both spring and fall, but avoid mid-summer crops as hot weather can cause premature bolting. Like spinach, can be grown in the spring or fall. In fact, you may be able to get a continual harvest throughout both seasons if you time planting correctly. A member of the cabbage family, broccoli is rich in vitamins.

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18. LETTUCE ⇓

    Lettuce greens are so easy to grow, so nutritious, and so delicious picked fresh from the garden, that everyone should grow them. Grow lettuce in the vegetable garden, tuck it into flowerbeds, or cultivate it in containers. With regular watering, shade from hot sun, and succession planting, you can enjoy homegrown lettuce almost year-round in much of the country.

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19. PEPPERMINT ⇓

     Peppermint (Mentha × piperita, also known as M. balsameaWilld) is a hybrid mint, a cross between watermint and spearmint. The plant, indigenous to Europe, is now widespread in cultivation throughout all regions of the world. It is found wild occasionally with its parent species. Mint is a perennial with very fragrant, toothed leaves and tiny purple, pink, or white flowers. It has a fruity, aromatic taste.

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20.CUCUMBER ⇓

    No summer garden should be without cucumbers. They are very easy to grow and are very prolific. Planted in a section of the garden that receives full sun and has an evenly moist, fertile soil, success is almost guaranteed.

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21. BEET ROOT ⇓

    Beetroot is able to provide you with anti-cancer and heart-protection properties thanks to its red pigments. Easy to grow, it is one of the top 10 vegetables grown in the home garden. Beetroot are easy to grow and ideal for anyone new to vegetable gardening. And beetroot is for more than pickling. Try roasting beetroot –or even trying it in your burger when you’re having a barbecue. For best results, sow beetroot little and often, harvesting the roots when they are young,tender and the size of a golf ball. The leaves can also be eaten. If you grow varieties for winter storage,it is possible to have beetroot almost all year round.

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22. CAPSICUM ⇓

    Capsicums (aka peppers) and the closely related chillis are warm season crops and really need to be left to mid spring before planting in cooler climates. Although they are technically perennial plants (go dormant in winter and regrow the following season) they are generally less productive in successive years and are best replaced each season with fresh seedlings.

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23. PEAS ⇓

    Bitter gourd plant is a fast growing creeper and is from the family of vines. It is also known as nutritious gourd and bitter melon. Bitter gourd plants vary shape, size and colour but the medicinal uses make bitter melon more important and distinct than other medicinal plant

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24. CABBAGE ⇓

    Cabbage (Brassica oleracea or variants) is a leafy green biennial plant, grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads. Closely related to other cole crops, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts, it descends from B. oleracea var. oleracea, a wild field cabbage. Cabbage heads generally range from 1 to 8 pounds (0.5 to 4 kg), and can be green, purple and white. Smooth-leafed firm-headed green cabbages are the most common, with smooth-leafed red and crinkle-leafed savoy cabbages of both colors seen more rarely.

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25. KNOLKHOL ⇓

    Kohlrabi is another name for our not-so-popular Knolkhol. It belongs to the same family as Cabbage and Cauliflower (Brassicaceae). The Whole plant is edible however, it is mostly used for its bulged swollen stem. It can be eaten raw as well as cooked. Though it prefers a cold weather, it does moderately well for our Bangalore weather. Botanical Name: Brassica caulorapa L.

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26. TURNIP WHITE ⇓

    • Turnips are biennials usually grown as annuals. Although turnips are more of a staple in European kitchens, many southern gardeners like to grow them for their greens. Turnips grow best in a temperate climate but can endure light frost. Different varieties can be used to lengthen the harvesting period.

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27. CAULIFLOWER ⇓

    Packed with rich nutrients, cauliflower or cabbage flower is one of the commonly used flower-vegetable. The flower heads contain numerous health benefiting phtyo-nutrients such as indole-3-carbinol, sulforaphane etc., that help prevent prostate, ovarian and cervical cancers.

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